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Across the Universe (Two-Disc Special Edition)
 : Across the Universe (Two-Disc Special Edition)



starring: Evan Rachel Wood, Jim Sturgess, Joe Anderson (VI), Dana Fuchs, Martin Luther (II)
directed by: Julie Taymor


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Price: $12.15
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Aspect Ratio: 2.40:1
Audience Rating: PG-13 (Parents Strongly Cautioned)
Binding: DVD
Brand: Sony
EAN: 0043396194625
Edition: Special Edition
Format: Multiple Formats, Anamorphic, NTSC
Item Dimensions: 5075034550
Label: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
Languages: ChineseSubtitledEnglishSubtitledFrenchSubtitledKoreanSubtitledPortugueseSubtitledSpanishSubtitledPortugueseDubbedDolby Digital 5.1SpanishDubbedDolby Digital 5.1EnglishOriginal LanguageDolby Digital 5.1EnglishSubtitles For The Hearing ImpairedDolby Digital 5.1EnglishUnknownDolby Digital 5.1
Manufacturer: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
MPN: 19462
Number Of Discs: 2
Number Of Items: 2
Picture Format: Anamorphic Widescreen
Publication Date: February 01, 2008
Publisher: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment
Region Code: 99
Release Date: February 05, 2008
Running Time: 133 minutes
Studio: Sony Pictures Home Entertainment

Features:
  • Condition: Used, Very Good
  • Format: DVD
  • Anamorphic; NTSC



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Editorial Review:

Product Description:
Across the Universe, from director Julie Taymor, is a revolutionary rock musical that re-imagines America in the turbulent late-1960s, a time when battle lines were being drawn at home and abroad. When young dockworker Jude (Jim Sturgess) leaves Liverpool to find his estranged father in America, he is swept up by the waves of change that are re-shaping the nation. Jude falls in love with Lucy (Evan Rachel Wood), a rich but sheltered American girl who joins the growing anti-war movement in New York's Greenwich Village. As the body count in Vietnam rises, political tensions at home spiral out of control and the star-crossed lovers find themselves in a psychedelic world gone mad. With a cameo by Bono, Across the Universe is "the kind of movie you watch again, like listening to a favorite album." (Roger Ebert, CHICAGO SUN-TIMES)

Amazon.com:
Given a track record littered by misfired oddities like the Bee Gees starring in the 1978 movie version of Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, successfully transforming The Beatles' epochal oeuvre into film musicals has been an elusive alchemy. Yet director Julie Taymor's 1968-centered, socio-political romance is more than just a stunning visual achievement. Its soundtrack brings a crucially intimate, emotionally engaging sensibility to its rich catalog of Beatles source material. Using an approach she rightly dubbed "organic," Taymor never gets too ambitious with the original arrangements, balancing the plaintive, often stark performances of central young stars Jim Sturgess and Evan Rachel Wood with equally compelling turns by supporting players Carol Woods and Joe Anderson. The stars successfully evoke early Beatlemania via the energetic charms of Sturgess' "All My Loving" and Wood's "It Won't Be Long," then get straight to the canon's often melancholy heart on his take of "In My Life," and her gentle cover of "Blackbird." Taymor's use of star turns--the entire point of too many Beatles-rooted projects--is as sparing as it is deft. Eddie Izzard's effusive "Being for the Benefit of Mr. Kite" is the product of several edited improvisations, while U2's Bono and Edge re-imagine "Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds" by way of Pink Floyd. Joe Cocker's swamp-dirge "Come Together" shows why he's long been one of the best interpreters of the Lennon-McCartney catalog, and Dana Fuchs alternately evokes the heavenly and hellish via her tender "Dear Prudence," as well as her manic, Joplin-channeling burn through "Helter Skelter." Elsewhere on the CD, Bono teams with Secret Machine for the straightforward "I Am the Walrus," while the Dallas indie rockers also take dream-pop turns on the instrumental "Flying" and George Harrison's haunting "Blue Jay Way." Remarkably, Taymor claims the bulk of the performances here were not lip-synced, but recorded live as the cameras rolled. --Jerry McCulley



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