Search
  
Back
The Simpsons and Philosophy: The D'oh! of Homer (Popular Culture and Philosophy)
 : The Simpsons and Philosophy: The D'oh! of Homer (Popular Culture and Philosophy)

variant image variant image

from: Open Court


Availability: Usually ships in 24 hours

List Price: $19.95
Price: $19.93
You Save: $0.02 ( 0%)
as of 12/16/2017 23:45 EST

This item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping.
Binding: Paperback
Brand: Open Court
EAN: 9780812694338
Edition: Underlined
Feature: Great product!
ISBN: 0812694333
Item Dimensions: 9006009850
Label: Open Court
Languages: EnglishPublishedEnglishOriginal LanguageEnglishUnknown
Manufacturer: Open Court
Number Of Items: 1
Number Of Pages: 256
Publication Date: February 28, 2001
Publisher: Open Court
Studio: Open Court

Features:
  • Great product!



Related Items: Alternate Versions: Click to Display

Browse for similar items by category: Click to Display



Editorial Review:

Product Description:
This unconventional and lighthearted introduction to the ideas of the major Western philosophers examines The Simpsons — TV’s favorite animated family. The authors look beyond the jokes, the crudeness, the attacks on society — and see a clever display of irony, social criticism, and philosophical thought. The writers begin with an examination of the characters. Does Homer actually display Aristotle’s virtues of character? In what way does Bart exemplify American pragmatism? The book also examines the ethics and themes of the show, and concludes with discussions of how the series reflects the work of Aristotle, Marx, Camus, Sartre, and other thinkers.


Amazon.com Review:
No doubt Aristotle just rolled over in his grave. An essay called "Homer and Aristotle" would appear to be a treatise on two ancient Greek thinkers; in this case, it's a depiction of Homer Simpson's Aristotelian virtues. Raja Halwani's "Homeric" essay is amusing, though, and moreover, it actually ends up being enlightening, especially for those just learning Aristotle's ethics. Bart may be a Nietzschean without knowing it; Mr. Burns is a cipher for unhappiness (except when he eats "so-called iced-cream"); and Ned Flanders raises questions about neighborly love. The Simpsons and Philosophy has a lot to say about The Simpsons, and even more to say about philosophy.

The book collects 18 essays into an unpretentious, tongue-in-cheek, and surprisingly intelligent look at philosophy through the lens of Matt Groening's vaunted animated series. The editors are quick to point out that they don't think The Simpsons "is the equivalent of history's best works of literature ... but it nevertheless is just deep enough, and certainly funny enough, to warrant serious attention." The writers of the book are mostly professional philosophers, and they are appropriately erudite. But what is truly astonishing, even for a confessed Simpsons addict, is their breadth of Simpsons knowledge, spanning all 12 seasons of the show's history. The Simpsons and Philosophy is obviously not intended to be a turning point in modern thought, but it is an excellent introduction to some core elements of philosophy. --Eric de Place



Reviews
Average Rating: none





Home | Reviews | Artists | Video | Shop | Links | Contact Us
Ebizagenda.com | Cozmik Toys | Indigo Tunes | Taliesin Records | In Association With Amazon.com | Endless.com
Copyright 2010-2014 CD Maximum
CD Maximum Metal and Rock Video
    View Cart / Checkout  
   Shop  
    Airsoft  
    Apparel  
    Automotive  
    Baby  
    Beauty  
    Books  
    Computers  
    DVD  
    Electronics  
    Hobby Shop  
    Jewelry  
    Kitchen & House  
    Magazines  
    Music  
    Musical Instruments  
    Office Products  
    Outdoor Living  
    Software  
    Photo  
    Sporting Goods  
    Studio Equipment  
    Tools & Equipment  
    Toys  
    Video Games